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Don’t Underestimate Your Website’s Copy

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New Content is CrucialEvery website project that Marketpath does follows the same process.  There is a hefty discovery portion of the project where we’ll discover everything from target audience & goals for the site, to design elements that will be utilized.  One question we always ask is about actual content on the site.  Who is going to write it?  What are you targeting?  Are you a good writer? 

Unfortunately, the content creation portion of a project is usually the portion of the projects that drag out the longest.  There are usually three different approaches to it (listed here from worst approach to the best):

Migrating old content to the new site

This is, by far, the worst approach that any company or organization can take.  Your old content was boring and doesn’t convert well (if it did, you wouldn’t be reworking your site).  Why would you want to mess up a fresh new site with stale content?  The reason this approach gets used so often, however, is that it’s the easy way out.  It doesn’t take any additional work, and therefore doesn’t cost any additional money.  However, not investing the time (or budget) into new content is just assuring your organization that the money spent on a new design was wasted.

Writing Content Internally

This approach, while better than just migrating the old stuff over to the new site, still leaves a lot to be desired.  Unless you have copywriters on staff, it is difficult for anyone within an organization to take a step back and write from a fresh vantage point.  Ultimately, you’re going to just polish up the old, stale content, utilizing the same boring, non-converting words and phrases.  Being entrenched in the day-to-day operations of a business can leave the mind at a loss when trying to create compelling content.

Outsourcing to a Professional

Ah, yes…we have a winner.  Within any new website budget, there should be a line item for content writing.  Depending on which firm you choose to work with, they may offer this service, so be sure to discuss it.  If the firm doesn’t offer a copywriting service, ask who they would recommend.  There are plenty of good writers (and companies) out there that make a living generating new content for companies.  Having a fresh take can prove to be an invaluable asset.  Another tip if you choose to outsource – think beyond your website.  Many of these writers will offer packages that can give you white papers, case studies, blog posts, and a myriad of different types of content.  Explore all your options.

The main takeaway: Content shouldn’t be an afterthought.  It is just as, if not more, important as a new design, new functionality, or a new brand.  Take that into consideration and you’ll have a much better chance at seeing a return on your investment.     



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Math vs. Content Problems – Why SEO as We Know it is Dead

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We attended Blog Indiana 2012 last week and came away with a new viewpoint on the SEO industry.  The two day conference was packed with speakers on various topics, but somehow, SEO always popped into their presentations.  The highlight, for me, was Doug Karr giving a presentation titled “SEO is Dead” (full slides at the link).  Even with the linkbait-like title, I was immediately intrigued with the topic.

SEO is Dead and DyingSEO, or the process of gaining higher rankings for search phrases, has been around for around for about 15 years.  It has gone through hundreds of changes as search engines have come and gone, evolved, and gotten smarter.  These changes always tweaked the algorithm in technical ways, but usually didn’t make drastic changes to the landscape of the web.  Well, in 2011 and 2012, Google has thrown the industry for a loop.  It has taken the complex math and statistics out of the equation and replaced it with something more transparent.  Keyword density, linking structure, link profiles, sculpting PageRank, and other statistic & math heavy topics are being discredited or even penalized.  Instead of focusing on what search engines want, these new changes seem to be moving search in a more traditional direction on the web.  SEO seems to be taking on characteristics of traditional marketing tactics.  Content creation, spreading the word socially, and converting visitors to customers are tactics of the new SEO.

Doug presented a lot of data around these changes and they all pointed in the same direction.  “SEO is not a math problem anymore, it’s a human problem.”

What does this mean for you?  Well, if you’re in charge of your SEO and you haven’t embraced the changes that were rolled out in the SPYW, Panda and Penguin changes, you’re already late to the party.  If you’ve contracted with an SEO firm to gain rankings and they haven’t talked about a content strategy, it’s time to evaluate your partnership with them.  It also means that if you’re a good marketer, but never really understood the link-building stuff, you’re in luck.  Do what you do best – update your site, create content, and share it to your audience. 

SEO isn’t dead, but it has definitely evolved once again.  This time, it has changed into something that more people are probably familiar with…good old, traditional marketing.    

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Online Marketing Strategy is Changing

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I’m not all together sure there is a more dynamic industry than online marketing.  With new tools, networks, tactics, and things to pay attention to debuting every day, how can anyone keep up?  It is a full-time job just staying on top of the latest trends, let alone rolling them out into a marketing campaign.  Gone are the days of launching a website with some keywords in the title tag and getting results.  Gone are the days of paying an SEO firm to "magically" gain rankings.  Gone are the days where this stuff was, well…easy. 

Change is Coming
‚ÄčAre you ready for it?

It has finally happened.  Consumers are becoming smarter each and every day.  Search engines are changing ranking factors every month (or so it seems).  Has your business taken a step back and accessed strategy lately?  If not, you’re behind the curve.  Consumers are well aware of what SEO is.  Just ranking highly for competitive keywords doesn’t cut it anymore.  What value are you providing?  Why should I buy from you or fill out that form on your website?

You see, even SEO firms are realizing the game has changed…the good ones anyway.  Tactics are changing.  The process is much more client facing and transparent.  And guess what…that’s a good thing.  It means that anyone and everyone can play in this space now, not just the guy with the deepest pockets.  Being the richest doesn’t mean you’re the best or that you deserve to gain customers online.  You must provide value.  You must provide content.  And most of all, you must do it often.

Stop worrying about linking strategy and start worrying about creating link-worthy content.  Stop worrying about ranking for competitive keywords and start worrying about ranking for more keywords.  Stop worrying about the technical side of SEO and start worrying about providing value to your potential clients. 

If you can do these things, you’ll be able to absorb changes in online marketing industry.  You won’t have to worry about dropping one spot in Google for your top keyword.  You can get back to doing what you do best…serving your customers.

 

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5 Signs You've Hired the Wrong SEO Firm

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When the time comes to hire an SEO agency to help boost your online presence and rankings, chances are you’re going to have a lot of questions.  This is okay.  I’ve been in and around the industry for close to six years and I am no expert.  Whether you’re a novice, someone who knows enough to be dangerous, or a seasoned veteran looking for some help, these 5 signs will help you eliminate a lot of so called “experts”. 

Guaranteed 1st Page Rankings

No Guarantee PleaseNo SEO company can or should offer a guarantee for first page rankings for your keywords.  I don’t care what else they say, or what else they show you, this is impossible.  Guarantees are the biggest red flag for any company and should end the conversation immediately.

Bottom Line - none of these companies work for or “have a special relationship with Google.”  It just doesn’t work that way.  Sure they may have a great track record, but guarantees are impossible to make in this industry.    

Won't Share Past Results

Piggybacking a bit off the first point, any SEO company that refuses to share their results with previous or current clients should be shown the door as well.  Any reputable SEO firm isn’t afraid to showcase their successes, their process, and even their failures.  Nobody is perfect in this industry, so be sure to ask them for examples or each. 

Bottom Line – Just because a company isn’t perfect doesn’t mean they won’t work for you.  Understanding the successes, process, and any failures they’ve had will go a long way in building a trusting relationship.

Unable/Unwilling to Give Explanations of Service/Process

No SEO Has ThisIf you hear the words “Through our proprietary process, your site will see an increase in rankings”, make sure you ask exactly what it is they are going to do.  If they are vague, too technical, or just very brief, ask for clarification.  If you’re still unclear, it could be time to look elsewhere. 

Bottom Line – In today’s SEO world, the knowledge of what works and what doesn’t is out on the web.  No firm should have an ace up their sleeve, or a proprietary process that nobody else uses (if they do, chances are it’s not a white hat tactic).

No Discussion of Overall Business Goals

Today’s SEO firms should act more as overall Internet Marketing consultants more than just “We swear we’ll improve your rankings” consultants.  The days of improving rankings by implementing nothing but a technical SEO strategy are gone.  Today, it’s more beneficial to build a brand, generate content, and share it across the web.

Bottom Line – Make sure the conversation leads to overall goals for the marketing plan and the business itself.  Improving rankings on a SERP should be part of an overall plan to grow, not the only strategy.

Links to Your Site Start Showing up in Questionable Places

No Spammy Links, PleaseAdding to the last point, a red flag that your SEO firm is engaged in some naughty practices would be that links to your site start showing up in questionable places.  Make sure you have Google Alerts and Google Webmaster Tools set up.  The Alerts will help flag any event on the web that involves a keyword (your business name), and the Webmaster tools will allow you to see which domains are linking to you.  If you see a suspicious domain, don’t hesitate to speak with your SEO firm and ask what they are doing.

Bottom LineGoogle is getting better and better at detecting these poor SEO practices.  Unfortunately, SEO firms still practice them religiously, so they need to be monitored and called out when possible. 

Contracting with an SEO firm is never an easy decision, but hopefully these five red flags will help you eliminate some of the less effective companies.  Keep in mind that communication is key.  There should always be an open dialog between client and agency in the SEO relationship.

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3 Mistakes Your Corporate Blog May Be Guilty Of

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So, you’ve taken the plunge and launched a corporate blog.  Congratulations!  All of the people that have been telling you for years that it’s a must finally won out, right?  Now, the hard part is here…making it actually worthwhile.  If you just said “Wait, what?” I don’t blame you.  Nobody told you that it was going to be difficult and time consuming.  Nobody told you that it’s not just as easy as throwing up a random thought here and there.  So, if that was your strategy, think again.  Here are 5 common mistakes businesses often make with their blogs, and some tips on how to improve them.

Lack of Updates

Consistency is KeyFirst things first, if you have a blog, you have to update it.  No exceptions.  No taking weeks at a time off (hi pot, we’re kettle).  Consistency is key here, not only for readers, but for search engines as well.  Nothing can kill a little momentum like an extended gap of silence. 

Tip – Combat this by creating a lot of content at once and scheduling that content to be released on a set schedule.  Shoot for 2 blog posts a week starting out.  Sit down at the beginning of each month and map out 8 blog topics, content associated with those, and which images are needed.  This may be a full day’s work, but it’s crucial for consistency.

Lack of Original Content

Corporate blogs aren’t meant for just PR and news items.  Sure, adding some of those types of posts in from time to time can be beneficial to your branding strategy, but news and PR should not dominate your blog.  The truly valuable content comes from thought-leadership, interesting conversation, and new ideas.  Try to avoid reliance on the PR type of article, as that content is better used elsewhere.

Tip – Your corporate blog is your chance to showcase your expertise and explore interesting topics.  Utilize sales and marketing collateral, find and explain industry trends, or showcase case studies.  As a general rule, one case study can often times be broken down into multiple blog posts.  Focus on one specific topic per post and create a series.

Lack of Promotion

Promote your BlogYour blog is part of your website (hopefully), but it doesn’t mean that it will gain any traction without some amount of promotion.  Why spend all of the time creating this great, original content if you’re just going to publish and forget about it?  These posts need promoted if they are going to get any value whatsoever.

Tip – Social media is a great way to promote content and gain new readers.  Focus on popular topics (hash tags on twitter) and be sure to promote the post via a simple tweet.  Look for opportunities to guest post on other blogs and be sure to reciprocate as well.  Growing your following on social media can have a tremendous impact on your blogging. 

What are some other pitfalls for corporate blogs and how do you avoid them?  Sound off in the comments below!  



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Marketpath Featured on MTFW Marketing Podcast

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On June 20th, TJ Furman from Marketpath was lucky enough to join Lorraine Ball and Allison Carter of Roundpeg on their weekly small business marketing podcast, More Than a Few Words.  The topic was content creation strategies and why just having a blog might not be enough.

If you're struggling to come up with content ideas that are interesting, we urge you to listen to the podcast and formulate a plan.  You can listen to the full show here:
 

 

If you have any additional ideas or want to join the conversation, make sure to leave your comments below.

 

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Businesses Say They Want Brand Awareness - They Need More

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Brand awareness is one of those nebulous terms we marketers like to throw around. But what does it actually mean? Brand awareness is simply a measure of how many people could pick your brand out of a lineup or say "oh yeah, I've heard of them!" In a perfect world, brand awareness is rigorously measured using market research, customer surveys and a variety of other tools to find out just who knows you. Unfortunately, most small business owners I know don't live in a perfect world. However, they still want brand awareness.

According to our 2012 Small Business Social Media Survey, the number one goal small businesses have for social media is to increase brand awareness. This is a consistent trend in each of the last three years in which we've conducted our survey.

For this question, respondents were allowed to select all applicable answers so we can see the full range of social activities. In a close race for second place among desired social media outcomes are client contact, finding clients, demonstrating expertise and driving web traffic. As small business owners look for affordable ways to market their companies, social media seems to fill the void.

                         

While many small businesses are using social media, I worry most still aren't using the tools to their fullest potential. As we mentioned, good brand awareness marketing should involve a heavy measurement piece that explains just what's working and what isn't. But since they rarely have the tools to truly measure brand awareness we think business owners should demand more from their social media.

 
I often tell business owners that marketing is like another employee. You would never hire an employee and then not hold him/her accountable for results. You need to do the same with your marketing. And it has never been easier. From the standpoint of measurable results, social media is a marketer's dream. It is easy to draw a pretty straight line from a specific post to traffic to your website and submissions to your conversion form. Yet the majority of companies in our study are not following through the process from contact to conversion.
 
                       

Most of the companies in the study track connections (78%) and web traffic (76%) which is a loose indicator of awareness, but not interest or willingness to buy. The more valuable measures, the elements which require interest and action are mentioned has as often: email subscriptions (42%), form downloads (33%) or RSS subscriptions (14%).

As you build your social medial plan think about the actions you will take, but if you are going to invest the time make sure you get the results you want.
 


About the author:

Lorraine BallAs Creative Director of Roundpeg, an Indianapolis-based marketing firm, Lorraine is typically at the center of the managed chaos that makes the agency run. With more than thirty years as a marketing professional (lie, tell her she doesn’t look that old) Lorraine keeps Roundpeg popping with a never-ending stream of new ideas.

A native New Yorker, Lorraine is a Hoosier by choice, and is committed to fostering growth and entrepreneurship in her adopted city. Recognized by the Indianapolis Business Journal as one of the Most Influential Women in Indianapolis, she is an active member of the local Indianapolis business community.

When not at Roundpeg, Lorraine can be found sharing what she knows in seminars and presentations around the country. She has a BA from Queens College, City University of NY, and an MBA from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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Link Buying & Gaming the System

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So, here we are, a little over a year removed from the JC Penny link buying debacle, and another major SEO player has gotten caught with their hand in the cookie jar.  I won’t go into detail about the latest case of blatant link buying, as you can find the details somewhere else, but I feel like the issue is worth revisiting.

Cash Under the Table
The Equivalent of Buying Links

The Link Buying Problem

In case you’re unfamiliar with the tactic, some SEO companies out there purchase links on their client’s behalf to help boost rankings.  This black hat tactic has been around since the dawn of Google, since they were the first search engine to put such an emphasis on a website’s link profile.  It used to work as simple as more links = higher rank.  Since then, the algorithm has changed dramatically, now focusing more on content, social, sharing, quality, page load speed, etc, but links are still a factor. 

Google has always stated that buying links is against their rules.  Here is the actual language from their site:

Buying or selling links that pass PageRank is in violation of Google’s Webmaster Guidelines and can negatively impact a site’s ranking in search results.

Not all paid links violate our guidelines. Buying and selling links is a normal part of the economy of the web when done for advertising purposes, and not for manipulation of search results. Links purchased for advertising should be designated as such.

However, as long as links are a factor in the ranking algorithm, companies and SEO firms are going to do anything possible to gain more of them.

How to Avoid Being the Next News Story

If you want to stay on Google’s good side, content marketing is the way to go.  Creating great, unique, relevant, & sharable content will allow your site to gain traffic and rankings.  The best part about this, the links will come naturally if you’re good at creating content.  Your site will begin ranking for hundreds and thousands of terms if you’re good at creating content.  Your site can break free of the “Keyword Jail Cell”, as I like to call it, and truly become a marketing tool.  Best of all, you don’t have to worry about changes in Google’s algorithm – content will always be king.

No SEO Should Have ThisIf you can’t take care of content marketing with in-house staff and you truly want results from your Internet marketing, then you can hire out some help.  One last word of advice, however, is to make sure whomever you choose to help you knows that you’re strictly against paying for links.  Sure it may work in the short term, but Google, and other watchdogs, are getting awfully good at noticing suspicious activity.  SEO firms these days should talk to you about your business goals, content creation, social strategy and overall marketing plans…not technical SEO.  If you can’t understand what they are going to do for you, don’t break out your checkbook.

Remember, Google's always trying level the playing field.  No company should have an ace up their sleeve.  If a tactic sounds fishy, it probably is. 

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Zen and the Art of Marketing Maintenance

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Maintenance is a topic that has been on my mind quite a bit lately. Maintenance of my lawn, house, vehicles, finances, children, diet, relationships, hair, and clothing are just a few of the things that must be maintained on a regular basis. Marketpath also requires regular maintenance of our finances, infrastructure, culture, client relationships, custom software, and much more. The key to success is maintaining items in small doses on a regular basis (i.e. performing small tasks here and there). The more consistent I am with regular maintenance, the more likely major problems won't appear. Failure to maintain each item in my life leads to neglect, which leads to me having to spend a lot more time and a lot more money which leads to great frustration.

Website marketing requires regular maintenancePart of the reason I've been contemplating the importance of maintenance is that I've been reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (yes, I stole the title for this post) - a philosophical novel that blends an attempt to define "Quality" and the importance of regular maintenance of our environment and our individual self.

Website marketing isn't all that different than anything else in our life. At Marketpath, we maintain our relationships with our customers and audience via our blogs, email blasts, social platforms, webinars, phone calls, and in-person meetings. I'm always pushing the importance of touch points and, if regularly maintained with good quality content, those touch points will result in a future sale or referral. Failure to regularly maintain  those touch points leads to a complete fall off of our audience engagement and an evaporation of sales and referrals.

Most marketers maintain a giant calendar with all the activity planned over the next few months. This is obviously important for the big items (trade shows and campaigns) but it is also import for the smaller, more easily maintained activities like blogging, social engagement, email sends, phone calls, etc. While these tasks may become slightly mundane or monotonous, they are still very important collectively over time.

If you fail to keep up your house it will fall into disrepair. Bringing it back to a normal state then requires more money, more time, and more frustration. Neglecting your website marketing efforts by not keeping a consistent schedule and constantly tweaking your message to keep your audience engaged will cause your marketing to fall into disrepair just as well. Then rebuilding the level of engagement you once had, or almost achieved, will require more time, more money, and more frustration. Keep it human, keep it consistent, and keep it meaningful.

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Which Social Network Is Right For My Business?

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As a small business owner, you’ve probably asked yourself this question.  With so many social networks out there, and more joining the list every day, it can be downright intimidating to choose the right one(s) and get started.  This post will focus on the big 5 – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and the relative newcomer and everyone’s favorite right now, Pinterest.

Facebook

FacebookWithout a doubt the largest social network on the web, with something like a gazillion users, a major motion picture detailing its rise, and now a $100 Billion IPO, everyone in the world has heard of Facebook.  So, as a business owner, you think more eyeballs = better ROI…right?  Well, maybe not.  Typically, Facebook is utilized by individuals connecting with friends and colleagues.  This mindset of person-to-person, casual interaction, limits the effectiveness of most B2B efforts on Facebook.  B2C companies on the other hand have more success with this, as it’s not uncommon for Facebook users to Like their favorite consumer brands…it’s basically a status symbol.   Millions of people Like Coca-Cola, BMW or their favorite handbag brand, not their HR Company or their web development company.

Twitter

TwitterTwitter has grown exponentially since its inception.  Users share ideas, links and images 140 characters at a time.  While the majority of tweets are utter nonsense or completely useless, B2B and B2C companies have found success here.  Connecting with thought leaders within an industry, interacting with competitors or customers, and giving clients the ability to gain instant feedback have all helped Twitter become a necessary part of a content marketing strategy.  The time it takes to run and monitor a twitter account can be pretty nominal with the right tools (and the right company to set it up for you), so it’s a good bet for any business.  Remember, twitter shouldn’t be used as a 1 way megaphone…nobody will care.  Share useful articles, talk about others, and participate in conversations.

LinkedIn

LinkedInWithout a doubt, LinkedIn is strictly a B2B social network.  Professionals use LinkedIn to connect on a business level with colleagues, clients, and people they have worked with.  Because users are in a business mindset when they are on the network, B2B efforts can be effective and useful.  The important point to remember here is that you’re not selling while you’re on this network.  Answer questions, solve problems, become the expert in a group of people and your efforts should be rewarded.

Google+

Google+Google+ is Google’s social network.  Depending on which articles you read, it is either dying or thriving.  It’s hard to say what the network will become, but it is important you keep an eye on it.  Google is using data it gathers from the network and plugging it into its search algorithm to help craft search engine results pages.  The more you share on Google+, the better the odds of ranking for particular terms…or at least that’s what it looks like so far.  All signs point to the fact we'll see more and more integration in the future, so it is probably wise to set up your account now. 

Pinterest

PinterestTaking the Internet by storm, Pinterest exploded onto the social networking scene due to its visual nature and simplicity.  The user base has grown extremely quickly, so one again may fall into the “more eyeballs = more leads” mentality.  Before you go jumping into Pinterest though, make sure you have a clear strategy and understanding of what is typically successful here.  Highly visual elements dominate, so your content may need overhauled to fit.  There have been stories of B2B and B2C success here, but the majority of those all revolve around certain industries.  Arts and crafts, recipes, fashion, and home décor are among the top items here, so tread lightly if you’re outside of those industries.

A few key things to remember about getting into social media:

  • Be consistent with your updates and conversations
  • Be real
  • Likes and retweets don’t pay the bills, conversions do…Can you get your followers to take action?

What are your tips for success on these networks?  Join the discussion below.

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